labyrinthnook:

June Duprez and Conrad Veidt in The Thief of Bagdad (1940), one of the greatest fantasy films ever made.

First of all, I will make two quick points:

1.) This is a plug for my new blog (I am nothing if not direct) about the wonderful filmmakers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger - their films are gorgeous and wonderful, and if you love imaginative cinema you should love their work. Give the blog a follow to see what I mean. 
2.) This image has nothing and everything to do with Labyrinth.

Please correct me if I’m wrong (if any of you have seen The Thief of Bagdad, I’d love to hear from you!), but since I imagine none of you have seen the film I will provide some context for you. The Thief of Bagdad is a very simple and old-school fantasy film, and was the model for Disney’s Aladdin - this is perhaps most evident in the ‘villain’ of both films, since the Jafar of the Disney film bears the name and the general appearance of the Jaffar of The Thief of Bagdad (played by the inimitable Conrad Veidt).

There is a key difference between the characters, however; Veidt’s Jaffar is far more interesting.

In the film, he essentially has one goal: to make the princess (June Duprez) love him. How he came to fall in love with her in the first place isn’t covered, since it’s entirely irrelevant - just as character psychologies are irrelevant in fairy tales. He pursues this goal single-mindedly, and I can only say that you should watch the film to truly comprehend the rather remarkable lengths he goes to.

In the still above, the princess has been tricked onto a boat by Jaffar, who is taking her away from her true love, Ahmad. Ahmad (a handsome but rather drippy young fellow) has been struck blind by Jaffar for princess-related reasons, and his sight will only be restored when the princess allows Jaffar to embrace her. Being utterly selfless and noble (of course!), the princess permits him to embrace her; this still is from that scene, and I think it’s rather marvellous since it embodies Jaffar as the proto ‘villain in love’.

Now, Jaffar is far from the first ‘villainous’ character in cinema to be drawn towards a good, beautiful and pure-hearted woman: that’s practically the plot of every Universal monster movie ever made. Jaffar is, however, different in several key ways. For a start, he’s not physically deformed; if you can find that now rare beast, the Conrad Veidt fangirl, you will learn that some people even consider him rather gorgeous. Secondly, the only really evil thing he does is go to eye-popping lengths to keep the princess to himself (admittedly, this involves animal transformation, conjuring epic storms and a murder).

To really get to the point, this still of the princess and Jaffar reminds me in many ways of what, in my opinion, appears to be the main crux of the Sarah/Jareth relationship: it involves a powerful older man with magical powers (Jaffar admits to being a magician when pressed) being rendered impotent by the resilience of a young girl. Despite the afore-mentioned ridiculous lengths that Jaffar goes to to make the princess yield to him, she does not; she constantly states her refusal of him and points out that she’s a slave despite his protestations to the contrary.  

Labyrinth is much more progressive than The Thief of Bagdad in that it features a girl resisting an older, magical man for her and her brother’s sake rather than the sake of her bland love interest. But still, I think the parallels are rather self-evident – and worth drawing your attention to. While the Jareth/Sarah relationship is striking and strange, it is far from a first.

labyrinthnook:

June Duprez and Conrad Veidt in The Thief of Bagdad (1940), one of the greatest fantasy films ever made.

First of all, I will make two quick points:

1.) This is a plug for my new blog (I am nothing if not direct) about the wonderful filmmakers Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger - their films are gorgeous and wonderful, and if you love imaginative cinema you should love their work. Give the blog a follow to see what I mean.
2.) This image has nothing and everything to do with Labyrinth.

Please correct me if I’m wrong (if any of you have seen The Thief of Bagdad, I’d love to hear from you!), but since I imagine none of you have seen the film I will provide some context for you. The Thief of Bagdad is a very simple and old-school fantasy film, and was the model for Disney’s Aladdin - this is perhaps most evident in the ‘villain’ of both films, since the Jafar of the Disney film bears the name and the general appearance of the Jaffar of The Thief of Bagdad (played by the inimitable Conrad Veidt).

There is a key difference between the characters, however; Veidt’s Jaffar is far more interesting.

In the film, he essentially has one goal: to make the princess (June Duprez) love him. How he came to fall in love with her in the first place isn’t covered, since it’s entirely irrelevant - just as character psychologies are irrelevant in fairy tales. He pursues this goal single-mindedly, and I can only say that you should watch the film to truly comprehend the rather remarkable lengths he goes to.

In the still above, the princess has been tricked onto a boat by Jaffar, who is taking her away from her true love, Ahmad. Ahmad (a handsome but rather drippy young fellow) has been struck blind by Jaffar for princess-related reasons, and his sight will only be restored when the princess allows Jaffar to embrace her. Being utterly selfless and noble (of course!), the princess permits him to embrace her; this still is from that scene, and I think it’s rather marvellous since it embodies Jaffar as the proto ‘villain in love’.

Now, Jaffar is far from the first ‘villainous’ character in cinema to be drawn towards a good, beautiful and pure-hearted woman: that’s practically the plot of every Universal monster movie ever made. Jaffar is, however, different in several key ways. For a start, he’s not physically deformed; if you can find that now rare beast, the Conrad Veidt fangirl, you will learn that some people even consider him rather gorgeous. Secondly, the only really evil thing he does is go to eye-popping lengths to keep the princess to himself (admittedly, this involves animal transformation, conjuring epic storms and a murder).

To really get to the point, this still of the princess and Jaffar reminds me in many ways of what, in my opinion, appears to be the main crux of the Sarah/Jareth relationship: it involves a powerful older man with magical powers (Jaffar admits to being a magician when pressed) being rendered impotent by the resilience of a young girl. Despite the afore-mentioned ridiculous lengths that Jaffar goes to to make the princess yield to him, she does not; she constantly states her refusal of him and points out that she’s a slave despite his protestations to the contrary.

Labyrinth is much more progressive than The Thief of Bagdad in that it features a girl resisting an older, magical man for her and her brother’s sake rather than the sake of her bland love interest. But still, I think the parallels are rather self-evident – and worth drawing your attention to. While the Jareth/Sarah relationship is striking and strange, it is far from a first.

mickeyandcompany:

More details about Disney’s Moana

Walt Disney Animation Studios revealed plans today for Moana, a sweeping, CG-animated comedy-adventure about a spirited teenager on an impossible mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest. In theaters in late 2016, the film is directed by the renowned filmmaking team of Ron Clements and John Musker (The Little Mermaid, The Princess and the Frog, Aladdin).
In the ancient South Pacific world of Oceania, Moana, a born navigator, sets sail in search of a fabled island. During her incredible journey, she teams up with her hero, the legendary demi-god Maui, to traverse the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous sea creatures, breathtaking underworlds and ancient folklore.
“John and I have partnered on so many films—from The Little Mermaid to Aladdin to The Princess and the Frog,” said Clements. “Creating Moana is one of the great thrills of our career. It’s a big adventure set in this beautiful world of Oceania.”
“Moana is indomitable, passionate and a dreamer with a unique connection to the ocean itself,” Musker said. “She’s the kind of character we all root for, and we can’t wait to introduce her to audiences.”
(Source: D23)

mickeyandcompany:

More details about Disney’s Moana

Walt Disney Animation Studios revealed plans today for Moana, a sweeping, CG-animated comedy-adventure about a spirited teenager on an impossible mission to fulfill her ancestors’ quest. In theaters in late 2016, the film is directed by the renowned filmmaking team of Ron Clements and John Musker (The Little Mermaid, The Princess and the Frog, Aladdin).

In the ancient South Pacific world of Oceania, Moana, a born navigator, sets sail in search of a fabled island. During her incredible journey, she teams up with her hero, the legendary demi-god Maui, to traverse the open ocean on an action-packed voyage, encountering enormous sea creatures, breathtaking underworlds and ancient folklore.

“John and I have partnered on so many films—from The Little Mermaid to Aladdin to The Princess and the Frog,” said Clements. “Creating Moana is one of the great thrills of our career. It’s a big adventure set in this beautiful world of Oceania.”

“Moana is indomitable, passionate and a dreamer with a unique connection to the ocean itself,” Musker said. “She’s the kind of character we all root for, and we can’t wait to introduce her to audiences.”

(Source: D23)

brookietf:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

paperseverywhere:

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And then I find out the fanfic hasn’t updated for over a year.

WE CAN ALL RELATE TO THIS POST

OH GOD THIS JUST STARTED HAPPENING TO MEEEEEE

theworldoflabyrinth:

This is just sexy, no more explanations.

theworldoflabyrinth:

This is just sexy, no more explanations.

onlylolgifs:

Turtle enjoying a bath)

sailortoasty:

ohhhh my gOD OH MY GOD LOOK AT HOW CUTE

sailortoasty:

ohhhh my gOD OH MY GOD LOOK AT HOW CUTE

bellefrench:

ever just the same / ever a surprise / ever as before / ever just as sure / as the sun will rise 

thedrawingduke:

I had “La Seine” stuck in my head all day long, so I had to draw Francoeur (with M wig) and Lucille for Inktober day 11! 
Here’s the song for reference:) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Z-NbQvhzKM
This is a gorgeous film with amazing conceptual art! Its on Netflix, so check it out! 
@thedrawingduke on twitter + instagram

thedrawingduke:

I had “La Seine” stuck in my head all day long, so I had to draw Francoeur (with M wig) and Lucille for Inktober day 11! 

Here’s the song for reference:) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Z-NbQvhzKM

This is a gorgeous film with amazing conceptual art! Its on Netflix, so check it out! 

@thedrawingduke on twitter + instagram

batbcomic:

disneydamselestelle:

I see no beast in this scene

So much actinnnnng *grabby hands*

batbcomic:

disneydamselestelle:

I see no beast in this scene

So much actinnnnng *grabby hands*